Reviews, Tips, Tricks & More

Learn YouTube SEO – Part 2 – Beginners

0 1359

Right so hopefully you’ll have seen the first part of this series Learn YouTube SEO – Part 1 – The Basics. If not then go read that then come back and read this one as I’m not going to go back over content. So for the beginners writing SEO we’re gonna touch on a few things, keywords, how to write for humans and bots and then three of the most important parts of your YouTube videos SEO strategy, namely the Title, Description and Tags.

I’m letting you know right now that this is a long read. You’ve been warned.

So as part of this series of YouTube SEO I figured I can tell you guys and girls do this that and the other but without any examples it can be hard to grasp or start out for some people as they’re more visual rather than others so here I’m gonna break an imaginary video down and we’ll use the same imaginary video throughout the series so you can see how it all links together.

SEO example – The Bike Review

Backstory: you’ve been test riding the New 2016 ZX6R, you got it from GoodCycles Kawasaki in Chester. You’ve had it for a week now and you’ve done a good amount of miles on various roads. 

It’s an amazing bike but you really hate a couple of things about it, the Kawasaki Intelligent Anti Lock Brake System (KIBS) is delayed, the Kawasaki Traction Control (KTRC) is too aggressive and the throttle is too twitchy for city/commuter use.

Okay so now we’ve got this backstory and we’ve formed our opinion on it, let’s skip past the actual video and say it’s the most amazing Oscar worthy video out there. You’ve uploaded it and here we sit at the computer. 

The Title

Now there’s a few routes we could go down for the title. But first lets do some research, so fire up Google and here we go, type the first most obvious title and see what the results look like, lets go with 2016 Kawasaki ZX6R Review. And here’s the results:

Kawasaki 2016 ZX6R YouTube Search Results

There are a lot of videos out there and the top is where we want to be. So in the other videos we have phrases like “Review” “In Depth” “Test Ride”, remember these phrases and the (KIBS) and (KTRC) ones, and also the twitchy throttle but also the good parts of it that could hook people in, look at the specs of the bike and remember them as they’ll help form part of the base of the description.

There’s a little competition for that title so for the length of this blog posts sake we’ll stick with that for now as any title with the word “review” in it has a chance of being on the first page of Google. 

We should to entice people to click even more go a bit further with it and add something like this “2016 Kawasaki ZX6R Review | This Bike Let Me Down” you’ve still got the all important bike name, year and review in there but now intrigue has been peaked and as we found out in the backstory saying it let you down is the truth so not clickbait, just a good title. Titles like this are an old tactic designed to peak the viewers interest and need to know. You can use them but only if it’s the truth and not a fabrication or an embellishment, otherwise you’re a clickbaiting cheeto-fuck. A couple variations on the above title:

| I Wanted To Love This Bike…

| I’ve Got 3 BIG Problems With This Bike

| Why Did They Ruin It?

And so on, build intrigue with the title and get them clicking the thumbnail because they need to know. As we’ve already found out we’re disappointed with the bike and that’s what we’d focus on. Conversely if we loved the bike we’d craft the title the other way:

| Is This The Best Bike In The World?

| Such An Awesome Machine

| They Made It Even Better

And so on, having just the standard title is okay, but adding a short summary few words at the end can get you more views as it peaks interest, the above won’t really help with SEO unless you decided to add the main problems in with it such as:

2016 Kawasaki ZX6R Review | The KIBS & KTRC Could Be Dangerous!?

2016 Kawasaki ZX6R Review | The ABS and Traction Control Could Be Dangerous!?

KIBS and KTRC (or more likely I’d choose ABS and Traction Control as they’re more well known terms in the community) in this case would form part of our tactic and strategy, exaggerating the danger element and also, you need to put in open statements like “could” or “would” etc… as if you don’t it could be considered slander and land you in trouble, if you definitively state that something is something then you leave yourself open to suing (just FYI), whereas if you form it as a question then you’re all good to go.

Anyway we’ve got our title, “2016 Kawasaki ZX6R Review | The ABS And Traction Control Could Be Dangerous!?

It has all the keywords in, bike year and name in first (as this is what the typical user would type in both YouTube and Google), review, generate interest with the end question and gives people a reason to find out more. With no need for clickbait, just a little bit of effort.

As an aside this is something you should remember when titling your videos, put the most important keywords first as this is the first thing YouTube reads.

The Description

Okay so the description will support the title and everything that’s in it, plus it’ll give the other details in, now, if you struggle with descriptions it’s best to think of them kind of like a story so it goes: intro, content, end.

The intro part is the first 3 lines of your YouTube video and these matter a hell of a lot, think of it as a teaser, which has the main points in, so our main points are that it’s a review of the 2016 ZX6R, what we like about it and what we don’t like about it, but remember the first few words are what will appear in the search results so it’s an added way to get interest for the viewer to click your video above everyone else’s.

Another tip for writing your description is to imagine you’re describing your entire video to a friend who knows nothing about it from start to finish.

So for this example I’d go with something like:

I got my hands on a 2016 Kawasaki ZX6R for a week to review and I’ve gotta say it’s an amazingly fast machine doing 0-60mph in under 3 seconds! I’ve got a couple of problems with the motorcycle though, mainly the ABS (KIBS) and Traction Control (KTRC) which could be borderline dangerous, plus this 16 plate Ninja has a twitchy throttle which makes city riding the ZX6R motorbike unbearable for me.

So that’s just something I’ve come up with quick to show you guys and girls something. I’m gonna highlight the keywords so you get a better understanding of the keywords we’re targeting and the structure.

I got my hands on a 2016 Kawasaki ZX6R for a week to review and I’ve gotta say it’s an amazingly fast motorcycle doing 0-60mph in under 3 seconds! I’ve got a couple of problems with the motorbike though, mainly the ABS (KIBS) and Traction Control (KTRC) which could be borderline dangerous, plus this 16 plate Ninja has a twitchy throttle which makes city riding the ZX6R motorbike unbearable for me.

So as you can see the above text reads okay for us as humans and it’s how we might describe it to someone if we were talking but we’ve got the keywords in there and the main ones first, we’ve got the value and the main points across and it leads the viewer into reading more plus some long tail keywords in there and even some left field ones that we’re not directly targetting but might get the benefit off. I find it good to read the sentence back a few times to make sure it sounds okay to the viewer and not too “bot centric” where the keywords are overwhelming.

Which, as a point to remember, keyword stuffing is an ancient practice and doesn’t work, it may have done back in 2006 but now, Youtube and Google recognise keyword stuffing is a bad practice and will actively punish you for it.

Now onto the main bulk of the description, as I said think of it like describing it to a friend that knows nothing about it, remember your keywords and let the creative juices flow. So I’m just gonna put something I’d put from this imaginary review after the main intro teaser above…

THE MAIN BODY INTRO

So I got to test ride the new 2016 Ninja ZX6R recently, GoodCycles in Chester graciously borrowed me the motorbike and well I’ve gotta say it’s a fantastic piece of machinery, the specs of the 16 plate ZX6R are amazing. The suspension is responsive and damn this bike is quick!

THE MAIN BODY

Taking the Ninja through the twisty roads is an absolute joy, with the Ohlins steering damper not letting me down, a great feature of this motorbike is the adjustable back-torque limiting clutch which can help reduce rear wheel lockup when downshifting at high speeds. A great addition to the Ninja range which means you can brake hard and accelerate even harder than before.

The double bore intake funnels of the 16 plate ZX6R means the high range rpms get a performance boost (as though the motorbike needed it!). However there’s a couple of problems I’ve found which I really think could make this bike borderline dangerous. The first is the ABS, but in Kawasaki’s terms it’s called the KIBS (Kawasaki Intelligent Anti-Lock Brake System), it’s just so unresponsive! I pressed the front and back when a van driver cut into a side road ahead of me and with a bike like this I’d expect it in an instant and it just wasn’t, it might be the speed (National Speed Limit) or the landscape blurring past me but it felt like it took forever to work, I even felt the back end starting to lock up!

The second point is the KTRC (Kawasaki Traction Control) or Traction Control to me and you. Not only is it a killjoy, in that it stops you even having the smallest amount of front wheel off the ground fun but going round a bend on the A34 in the rain wasn’t fun, it lost traction slightly which isn’t a massive deal but it’s not something I’d expect in a bike of this calibre. Traction control that stops fun but doesn’t stop you slipping when you need it, what’s that about!? I expected more from a 2016 600cc Ninja.

Also, you know how I said in the twisties that the bike was amazing? Well in the city the throttle is so twitchy that going through traffic is an absolute chore, aside from bunny hopping all over the shop, it made me too afraid to even give the motorcycle the slightest amount of throttle for fear of rear ending a hapless van driver, really not good. Plus having such a high concentration level for an extended amount of time on a motorbike means you’re more prone to mistakes. Damned if you do and damned if you don’t is the tagline from Kawasaki HQ for the 2016 Ninja range it seems.

END REVIEW SUMMARY

I wanted to love this bike, and I do… but only when on the A roads and B roads going slightly above the speed limit. For me as a year round commuter the woeful ABS and Traction Control combined with the overly aggressive throttle means that it’d be a real pain in the arse to ride and not worth the effort. For me, it’s a solid HELL NO. Maybe the 2017 ZX6R Ninja will address some of the problems, they’re gonna have to.

END STATEMENT

Massive thanks to GoodCycles Kawasaki in Chester for letting me review the bike, if you want to test ride a brand new 2016 Kawasaki then give them a shout at http://www.GoodCyclesKawasaki.co.uk and let them know I sent you, they have both new and used motorcycles for everyone, from 06-16 plate low milage bikes in the Cheshire area they can’t be beaten on price or customer service, I love chatting to them about possible bikes I can review later on and some feedback I can give them and they really do listen to me.

(Links Below)

Okay so that’s kind of what I’d put in this imaginary scenario, for the (Links Below) I’d have these as Upload defaults so in there would be my social media, the music I’ve used and then my gear with affiliate links to buy them so I might make some side revenue. The Upload Defaults really help you streamline the upload process and help cross link your videos in the Up Next And Related Videos feed.

Anyway, lets break down the above text and highlight the keywords we’ve targeted:

THE MAIN BODY INTRO

So I got to test ride the new 2016 Ninja ZX6R recently, GoodCycles in Chester graciously borrowed me the motorbike and well I’ve gotta say it’s a fantastic piece of machinery, the specs of the 16 plate ZX6R are amazing. The suspension is responsive and damn this bike is quick!

THE MAIN BODY

Taking the Ninja through the twisty roads is an absolute joy, with the Ohlins steering damper not letting me down, a great feature of this motorbike is the adjustable back-torque limiting clutch which can help reduce rear wheel lockup when downshifting at high speeds. A great addition to the 2016 Ninja range which means you can brake hard and accelerate even harder than before.

The double bore intake funnels of the 16 plate ZX6R means the high range rpms get a performance boost (as though the motorbike needed it!). However there’s a couple of problems I’ve found which I really think could make this bike borderline dangerous. The first is the ABS, but in Kawasaki’s terms it’s called the KIBS (Kawasaki Intelligent Anti-Lock Brake System), it’s just so unresponsive! I pressed the front and back when a van driver cut into a side road ahead of me and with a bike like this I’d expect it in an instant and it just wasn’t, it might be the speed (National Speed Limit) or the landscape blurring past me but it felt like it took forever to work, I even felt the back end starting to lock up!

The second point is the KTRC (Kawasaki Traction Control) or Traction Control to me and you. Not only is it a killjoy, in that it stops you even having the smallest amount of front wheel off the ground fun but going round a bend on the A34 in the rain wasn’t fun, it lost traction slightly which isn’t a massive deal but it’s not something I’d expect in a motorbike of this calibre. Traction control that stops fun but doesn’t stop you slipping when you need it, what’s that about!? I expected more from a 2016 600CC Ninja.

Also, you know how I said in the twisties that the bike was amazing? Well in the city the throttle is so twitchy that going through traffic is an absolute chore, aside from bunny hopping all over the shop, it made me too afraid to even give the motorcycle the slightest amount of throttle for fear of rear ending a hapless van driver, really not good. Plus having such a high concentration level for an extended amount of time on a motorbike means you’re more prone to mistakes. Damned if you do and damned if you don’t is the tagline from Kawasaki HQ for the 2016 Ninja range it seems.

END REVIEW SUMMARY

I wanted to love this bike, and I do… but only when on the A roads and B roads going slightly above the speed limit. For me as a year round commuter the woeful ABS (KIBS) and Traction Control (KTRC) combined with the overly aggressive throttle means that it’d be a real pain in the arse to ride and not worth the effort. For me, it’s a solid HELL NO. Maybe the 2017 ZX6R Ninja will address some of the problems, they’re gonna have to.

END STATEMENT

Massive thanks to GoodCycles Kawasaki in Chester for letting me review the bike, if you want to test ride a brand new 2016 Kawasaki then give them a shout at http://www.GoodCyclesKawasaki.co.uk and let them know I sent you, they have both new and used motorcycles for everyone, from 06-16 plate low mileage bikes in the Cheshire area they can’t be beaten on price or customer service, I love chatting to them about possible motorbikes I can review later on and some feedback I can give them and they really do listen to me.

(Links Below)

Okay so above we can see the structure and it goes like this: Intro (Teaser), Main Body Intro, Main Body, End Statements, Upload Defaults.

The reason I’ve structured it like this is because we’re trained from being babies to read like this and it’s how the vast majority of things are written in the Western World, it’s a story, it has an intro, the main body and an end.

This is by no means a finished description and I’d go back and do some tweaks to it to either put in a few more keywords or take some out, all the while I’d keep checking, re-reading and making sure it still sounded correct.

This is a good practice to get into as having those end statements really brings your description to a close. The viewer reads it and knows that this is the end of it.

The Tags

So, now we’ve done this we’re gonna target the Tags and this is now, because of the groundwork we’ve done before in our Title and Description the easiest job of all. I go on about Video Tags and how they work in another blog post here.

Okay so aside from our default tags which we should all have we’re gonna add the obvious ones and the long tail keywords (long tail keywords are more like key phrases in that they’re 3-4 words long, very specific, not highly searched for but enough so you can dominate the search queries for it). I’ll show them below. Now on Youtube you only have 500 characters to play with for your tags and your defaults will take some of them up. (Default tags help Youtube see that each of your videos are related to each other).

I’m just gonna list the different tags we could use for this video:

  • 2016 Kawasaki ZX6R review (long tail but main)
  • 16 plate ZX6r review (long tail but main)
  • 2016 600CC Ninja Review (long tail but main)
  • review
  • bikes
  • ninja
  • kawasaki
  • motorcycle
  • motorbike
  • motorbike review
  • motorcycle review
  • test ride
  • first ride
  • zx6r
  • ZX6R
  • 2016 zx6r
  • 2016 ninja
  • twitchy throttle
  • KIBS
  • KTRC
  • Traction Control
  • ABS
  • ABS Failed
  • Traction Control Failed (sub long tail)
  • double bore intake funnels (sub long tail)
  • adjustable back-torque limiting clutch (sub long tail)
  • KTRC (Kawasaki Traction Control) (sub long tail)
  • KIBS (Kawasaki Intelligent Anti-Lock Brake System) (sub long tail)
  • GoodCycles Kawasaki
  • GoodCycles Kawasaki Chester (sub long tail)
  • GoodCycles Used MotorBikes (sub long tail)
  • Cheshire
  • New and used motorcycles (sub long tail)

So there’s quite a few examples of tags we could use for this video and it’s based on the keywords in our description. We’ll also have our upload defaults as well. Tag research can be a laborious task and it can be made easier by using the browser plugin called TubeBuddy, I use it for every upload I do and it makes the whole process so much simpler. I did a review of TubeBuddy here, but if you want it for yourself click this link right here.

I think that is where I’m gonna leave it for this one, get the basics right and you’ll set your video up to be found by more people, appear higher in search results, get your channel and video more views, more adsense revenue, more opportunities to get more bikes or whatever product it is you want to review and more.

I know I’m doing this for a specific video but the concepts can be applied to any YouTube video out there, from daily vlogs to the more obscure videos you might make, everything can be targeted with keywords and made the most of.

The next blog post on this series is the Intermediate piece where I’ll go on about cross linking, more advanced tactics to get your videos noticed and more. But you need to get the foundations right first and foremost so your whole structure doesn’t fall flat on it’s face and the Title, Description and Tags is how you can build a strong base that works for you and gets your videos noticed by more people.

Peace Out And Happy Creating – 6M

I’m a Manchester based Motovlogger on YouTube, with over a decade of marketing and design experience including SEO, analytics and branding, my mission is to help out fellow YouTubers with their own YouTube channels and to help them grow as much as they can.

Learn more. Do more. Be more.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *